[Tig] what is where (tk count)

Claydon Laurence Laurence.Claydon
Tue Jul 16 15:15:22 BST 2002


I would be very interested to know what the rates are at the South
African (Cape Town) post houses, given that the Rand has been slipping
recently against the pound; (4:1 1994; 10:1, 1999; 17:1 currently).

Anyone calculating payback for a new telecine suite based on projected
business and market share at present will appreciate the issues even
without the 17:1 exchange rate.....

Laurence Claydon
Chief Engineer
Technicolor Imaging UK

> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Pedro Conforti [SMTP:pedroconforti at mac.com]
> Sent:	16 July 2002 14:13
> To:	tig at tig.alegria.com
> Subject:	Re: [Tig] what is where (tk count)
> 
> Here in Brasil things are going from bad to nightmare in the telecine
> field
> (and the whole post production market) since 2000. It can be explained
> by 3
> main reasons:
> 
> 1) the US dollar exchange rate change against Brasil's Real in the
> last 4
> years. Since it have gone from an 1-1 rate to a 3-1 basis, clients who
> used
> to pay, say R$600 (US$600) for an hour of SD work with the best
> colorist,
> are now paying about R$450 (US$158) due to the Real devalue;
> 
> 2) Since the market is really low these days, clients keep pushing
> prices
> unfairly down and down, accepting even lower quality on their jobs (by
> working with begginers), so they can get ridiculous discounts, like 50
> Reais
> less / hour (about US$18).
> 
> 3) And remember, whenever we buy new equipment, we pay in US$,
> although our
> clients pay us with Reais. You can guess how difficult it is to keep
> up a
> business so expensive like ours with such a low income.
> 
> So now prices are more or less like this:
> 
> R$ 450-650  - SD commercial
> R$ 300-450  - SD music videos / dailies
> R$ 900-1000 - HD commercial
> R$ 800-900  - HD music video
> 
> in US$, this would be:
> 
> US$ 158-230  - SD commercial
> US$ 105-158  - SD music videos / dailies
> US$ 315-351  - HD commercial
> US$ 280-315  - HD music video
> 
> As you can see, prices are unbelievable low here these days. I hope
> something happens to change this situation, because having almost no
> work,
> at this price, cannot lead any post-production house to a bright
> future.
> Unfortunatly, this is the kind of situation that clients choose to
> ignore
> until it is too late.
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Pedro
> 
> 
> --
> O cinema ? a m?sica da luz.
> Abel Gance
> --------------------------------------------------
> Pedro Conforti - Colorista - Estudios Mega
> --------------------------------------------------
> 
> 
>   
> 
> on 16.07.2002 5:24 AM, bobineinc at aol.com at bobineinc at aol.com wrote:
> 
> > For a column on the hourly price for a telecine room and a salary
> for a
> > professional colorist in LA.
> > Since the 80's the price has been pretty stagnant. In average the
> price for
> > STD is $1000 for commercial work and $750 for music video, it use to
> be $500
> > for feature now $1000 HD and $1500 Data) an hour.
> > After tax, 25% off that price go to the highest pay colorist with
> stocks
> > options (rare), the other colorists are chasing the same sweet deal.
> > Now due to the slow down there has been a lot of under cutting by
> post houses
> > with colorist that work more than 16 hours a day or any time, for
> $550 STD
> > commercials, $350 STD for music videos and features $550 HD and $600
> Data.
> > Lay down session as low as $200 per hours in some case (plus free B
> with good
> > clients). 
> > The market is distorted because no matter how low a client wants to
> pay there
> > is a colorist hungry enough to do the job (usually the Highest pay
> will
> > work).  
> > Agencies, Productions and Records company are more aggressive in
> demanding
> > their favorite Colorist and also the approval of every frames. But
> the
> > general public expectation as gone way down.
> > In the 80's and 90's Colorist market was booming and the last three
> years
> > some of the colorists did well, but none fell the business was
> great. Those
> > who have done well are in a small number and they have branch out as
> owner or
> > partners taking charge of their clients. The kind who insist in
> coloring only
> > and let the rest to there CEO will probably be a dying breed when
> they start
> > to see the disadvantages. It not enough for a colorist to know
> color, it
> > needs to known its clients, and manage the clients service needed
> with help
> > from the upper management.
> > PS: Higher price will help to leverage the client to increase their
> rates and
> > manufacturer to survive. Maybe a colorist group can be form to
> educate each
> > other on good business practice until now everything goes in the
> Hollywood
> > jungle.  
> > If you don't agree please jump in....
> > Jais /Bobine (pronounce Bo Been)
> > 
> > In a message dated 7/15/02 12:19:29 PM, rob at film.calarts.edu writes:
> > 
> > << I'm going to be working a lot more on the telecine count table
> > as soon as I can, and appreciate all the input from everyone.
> > 
> > One suggestion was made that is pretty interesting:
> > 
> > what if we had a column for hourly rates in the different facilities
> > and countries, based on a common currency and exchange rate at a
> certain
> > time?  Perhaps it would be too difficult to keep up-to-date.
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> --
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> --
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> 
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