[Tig] types of film (technicolor)

Martin Euredjian ecinema
Wed Mar 9 13:53:28 GMT 2005


> sure Martin, but it's not the data we're talking about, it's the medium,
as you get into next...

If you are talking archival, and, if you are taking a truly long-term view,
the medium matters not.  It's about the data.  Which can live forever if
whoever owns it cares enough to keep it alive.


> Storing digital data on film has its adherents; an array of bits is
photographed for each frame of film.

This can't even begin to approach the data storage density of MEMS based
technologies.

Interestingly enough, this month's IEEE spectrum has a nice article on a
technology that's been in development for quite some time.  Here's a link to
the online version:

http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/WEBONLY/publicfeature/mar05/0305mili.html

There are other technologies that'll compete with this approach.  Some
significantly more robust and possibly denser.

On the question of cost and labor for data replication.  Look, today I can
fire-off a "dub" of a 400GB hard drive, go to sleep and have it done by
morning.  I think that drive cost about US$300, below US$1 per GB. Five
years ago that would have taken DAYS and probably run about US$5 per GB.
Ten years ago, if even possible, WEEKS and maybe US$100 per GB.  And so, it
is perfectly reasonable to expect that in ten years MEMS-based storage
devices will be able to replicate and store terabytes with relative ease and
at very low cost (US$1 per TB?).  It's probably not too far fetched to think
that entire film-studio libraries will eventually fill just a few
filing-cabinets rather than huge environmentally controlled vaults.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Martin Euredjian
eCinema Systems, Inc.
voice: 661-305-9320
fax: 661-775-4876
martin at ecinemasys.com
ecinema at ieee.org
www.ecinemasys.com
 
 






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