[Tig] Dolby Vision

Robert Frye bcfrye at earthlink.net
Tue Apr 15 16:19:58 BST 2014


> My comment is based entirely on the two videos I watched in your referenced articles.  One was from Display Central.

That's what I was afraid of… there's NO way a typical video camera or still camera can adequate reproduce this type of HDR content… especially when it's in a dark grading room environment,
and the camera is using an averaging metering system.  At very least, you'd need a spot meter type of function, so that the peal luminance doesn't clip and wash out the rest of the frame.  I've rarely seen a still or video of an HDR presentation look anything like the real deal.  Honestly, if I was at Dolby and handling this project, I'd not allow any photos or videos of the demos for this very reason… they all do a HUGE disservice to the content and how it looks.  But I'm not, so they get to suffer with this type of misrepresentation of their excellent work.

Bob you really must see this in person before making such dramatic comments about the image quality.

> TV vendors are not interested in making products that they can not sell in California.  Notice that plasma panel power consumption dropped way down after California introduced its power consumption laws.

Energy Star requirements as administered by the EPA are a Federal Standard.  Car emissions are also federally mandated, but states like CA can override with their own higher standards (in the case of cars, this is handled at the pump with regs on our gasoline.)  I'm not aware of state variations in Energy Star regulations… if this is the case, what s nightmare for manufacturers!!

bob


On Apr 15, 2014, at 6:45 AM, Bob Friesenhahn wrote:

> On Mon, 14 Apr 2014, Robert Frye wrote:
> 
>> Bob that's an interesting comment you made regarding the Dolby Vision demo looking washed out.  Was this the public demo in the main booth area or in the private "grading suite" demo with the Baselight?  I only saw the outside demo and the content I viewed was
> 
> My comment is based entirely on the two videos I watched in your referenced articles.  One was from Display Central.
> 
> In these videos, the Dolby Vision side was much brighter, with the sky being almost entirely washed out and almost everything in the image was brighter.  The rules of physics still apply so I suspect that the Dolby Vision side was cranked up much brighter.
> 
>> You're dead on re: the issues with consumer display and the cinema. The consumer TV's slated for Dolby Vision may not go much above 800 nits, which will be an improvement, but not as much as 2k or 4k nits.  Making displays that can hit 2k nits and above is not an easy process, power consumption being one significant hurdle.  The power requirements of Dolby's big 4,000 nit prototype is pretty high. And as you say, brightness does to varying degrees, equate to cost. I would guess that ultimately, higher brightness will become a feature that's simply absorbed into the products as another feature, similar to how many TV's are now "smart."
> 
> TV vendors are not interested in making products that they can not sell in California.  Notice that plasma panel power consumption dropped way down after California introduced its power consumption laws.
> 
> Projection TVs would likely need to use laser scanning in order to meet power requirements as well as actual HDR.  Otherwise the projection bulb would need to produce a uniform brightness at least as bright as the brightest pixel.
> 
> Bob
> -- 
> Bob Friesenhahn
> bfriesen at simple.dallas.tx.us, http://www.simplesystems.org/users/bfriesen/
> GraphicsMagick Maintainer,    http://www.GraphicsMagick.org/




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