[Tig] Canon 4K monitor

Robert Frye bcfrye at earthlink.net
Fri Jan 24 19:09:10 GMT 2014


Oh yes, Quantum dots… very interesting technology, with a lot of promise.  

One thing to consider re: professional applications vs. consumer applications.  Consumer displays of course do not require
the stringent color accuracy that professional displays require.  So it's natural to see a consumer product appear in the market
well before professional displays

Largely a factor of how many vendors of a given technology a manufacturer can source… LED's and related components are
a mature technology with many vendors… if one doesn't give you the goods to hit the marks you need, you can go to another
vendor.  That's a short version of how we got RGB LEDs six years ago to deliver precise P3 coordinates in the PRM.

Q dots as a new technology has far fewer vendors, potentially making the development of a highly precise professional display
more challenging.  Not that it can't be done, of course, just more challenging.


On Jan 24, 2014, at 10:52 AM, Martin Parsons wrote:

> This illumination density problem may be solved by quantum dot technology a.k.a. QLEDs
> 
> I believe there were demonstrations at CES a couple of weeks back
> 
> Here's an article from a reasonably regarded publication
> http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23591-quantum-dot-displays-make-your-tv-brighter-than-ever.html#.UuK0xHiQG0c
> 
> Be interesting if there are any professional monitors using this technology at NAB this year. 
> 
> Martin
> 
> Martin Parsons
> www.image-eyes.com
> 
>> On 24 Jan 2014, at 18:29, Robert Frye <bcfrye at earthlink.net> wrote:
>> 
>> Sohonet www.sohonet.co.uk sponsors the TIG.
>> Support from Digital Vision www.digitalvision.tv
>> Support from MediaCloud www.MediaCloud.cc
>> =====
>> 
>> 
>> No RGB LEDS exist that are small enough to give you a 1:1 relationship to LED and pixel on the LCD.  Thus there has to be significant algorithmic solutions to eliminating and minimizing the
>> artifacts that could be created by this situation.  Tricky stuff, to be sure!
>> 
>> As to whether this is a problem for the PRM, I'd have to say, let your eyes be the judge.  Test signals are interesting, but real world content is what we all deal with, what we all grade and 
>> earn our livings with… not test signals :)    The fact that the PRM won an EMMY in 2012 should suggest that, at very least, the engineers did an amazing job at dealing with this (and many other) issues when developing the monitor.  And believe me when I say, I've worked with many outstanding engineers in my day, but I've never been more impressed with the talented bunch of folks who solved so many of the challenges with developing the PRM. 
>> 
>> And of course, it's a fact that *no* monitor is perfect.  
>> 
>> Bob
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jan 24, 2014, at 10:11 AM, Riza Pacalioglu wrote:
>>> 
>>> "Dolby BLU is direct illumination and every single R, G, and B element within each of over 1500 RGB triads is controlled algorithmically to dim per the content."
>>> 
>>> On CML there was a post about the problems one can get with dimming LED array LCD monitors. As the number of array elements (pixels) are orders of magnitude smaller than the actual picture elements dimming effect creates artefacts on the image. I have not tested the Dolby monitor with the test signals that the poster had supplied but I have tested other so called master monitors of the LCD type and they all failed fantastically. Since then my eye keeps seeing those failures on such monitors which are littered all over the post houses.
>>> 
>>> My question will be, does Dolby also suffer from this or that Dolby has much smaller RGB LED array that the issues are almost eliminated?
>>> 
>>> All the best
>>> 
>>> Riza Nur Pacalioglu M.Sc.
>>> Producer
>>> Silver Productions, Salisbury, England
>>> http://silver.co.uk
>> 
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> http://tig.colorist.org/wiki3
>> To unsubscribe, see http://tig.colorist.org/mailman/listinfo/tig




More information about the Tig mailing list